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New report sheds light on the renal cell carcinoma pipeline review H1 2015 - WhaTech

New report sheds light on the renal cell carcinoma pipeline review H1 2015

The report enhances decision making capabilities and help to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. It strengthens R&D pipelines by identifying new targets and MOAs to produce first-in-class and best-in-class products.

ACCESS REPORT : Renal Cell Carcinoma - Pipeline Review, H1 2015

Summary ‘Renal Cell Carcinoma - Pipeline Review, H1 2015’, provides an overview of the Renal Cell Carcinoma’s therapeutic pipeline. This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Renal Cell Carcinoma, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases. It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Renal Cell Carcinoma and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects. This report features investigational drugs from across globe covering over 20 therapy areas and nearly 3,000 indications. The report is built using data and information sourced from Global Markets Direct’s proprietary databases, Company/University websites, SEC filings, investor presentations and featured press releases from company/university sites and industry-specific third party sources, put together by Global Markets Direct’s team. Drug profiles/records featured in the report undergoes periodic updation following a stringent set of processes that ensures that all the profiles are updated with the latest set of information. Additionally, processes including live news & deals tracking, browser based alert-box and clinical trials registries tracking ensure that the most recent developments are captured on a real time basis. Scope - The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Renal Cell Carcinoma
- The report reviews key pipeline products under drug profile section which includes, product description, MoA and R&D brief, licensing and collaboration details & other developmental activities
- The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Renal Cell Carcinoma and enlists all their major and minor projects
- The report summarizes all the dormant and discontinued pipeline projects
- A review of the Renal Cell Carcinoma products under development by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
- Pipeline products coverage based on various stages of development ranging from pre-registration till discovery and undisclosed stages
- A detailed assessment of monotherapy and combination therapy pipeline projects
- Coverage of the Renal Cell Carcinoma pipeline on the basis of target, MoA, route of administration and molecule type
- Latest news and deals relating related to pipeline products Reasons to Access - Provides strategically significant competitor information, analysis, and insights to formulate effective R&D development strategies
- Identify emerging players with potentially strong product portfolio and create effective counter-strategies to gain competitive advantage
- Develop strategic initiatives by understanding the focus areas of leading companies
- Identify and understand important and diverse types of therapeutics under development for Renal Cell Carcinoma
- Plan mergers and acquisitions effectively by identifying key players of the most promising pipeline
- Devise corrective measures for pipeline projects by understanding Renal Cell Carcinoma pipeline depth and focus of Indication therapeutics
- Develop and design in-licensing and out-licensing strategies by identifying prospective partners with the most attractive projects to enhance and expand business potential and scope
- Modify the therapeutic portfolio by identifying discontinued projects and understanding the factors that drove them from pipeline VIEW REPORT TOC

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Prevalence and determinants of chronic kidney disease in rural and urban ... - BMC Blogs Network

Study design and setting

This was a cross-sectional study of 6-month duration (February to July 2014), conducted in the health district Dschang in the Western Region of Cameroon (Fig. 1).

thumbnail Fig. 1. Dschang district in the Western Region of Cameroon

Study participants

Sources of participants

According to the data from the regional delegation of health for the Western Region of Cameroon, Dschang health district is the largest health district in the region, with an estimated population of 309,285 inhabitants in 2012, distributed across 22 health areas (19 rurals and 3 urbans) (2012 annual activity report of the regional delegation of health for Western Cameroon). Dschang is home to the largest university in the Region and therefore has a cosmopolitan population reflecting the ethnic diversity of the country. The adult population in urban areas comprises students, traders, civil servants and middle income earners from private sectors while farmers are predominant in rural area. This study was approved by the Cameroon National Ethics Committee, and all participants provided a written informed consent before enrolment.

Eligibility criteria

Eligible participants were adults aged 20 years and above who had been living in the study setting for more than three months. We excluded individuals with serious mental or physical (limb amputation or paralysis) disability, pregnant or breastfeeding women and participants with simultaneous leucocyturia and urine nitrites.

Selection of participants

We used a multi-level cluster sampling including the health area (first level), the village (second level), the neighbourhood (third level) and the household (fourth level). The sequence below was followed to select the clusters and corresponding health areas. 1) We first assumed the number of clusters needed to be 30; 2) We then determined the sampling interval (SI) which corresponded to 10310, by dividing the population of Dschang health district by the number of clusters; 3) We determined the first cluster or random number (RN) by selecting the four last numbers of a randomly selected bank note which corresponded to 1399; 4) We next estimated the cluster number size (C (n) ) from the formula C (n) ?=?RN+(n-1)*SI where n is the cluster number; 5) The various health areas (with their corresponding population size) were then sorted in alphabetic order and progressive cumulative population size estimated (see Additional file 1: Table S1); 6) The last step consisted of selecting the health areas. For a health area to be selected, the size of the corresponding cluster number had to be less than the health area population. This action was repeated until the size of the cluster number became superior to the health area population; we then moved to the following health area in the table. The selected health areas and corresponding clusters are presented in Additional file 1: Table S1.

In a selected health area, one village/neighbourhood was randomly drawn when there was more than one regardless of the population size. The starting point was randomly selected from the market, church, health centre or school in the village/neighbourhood. Thereafter, we randomly selected the direction while the side of road was chosen with the aid of coin toss. We entered consecutively in the households where we randomly selected per household a maximum of two adults aged 20 years and above among those who had been living in the household for more than three months. For each household declining to participate, the next household was selected until the total number required for the cluster size was reached. The cluster size ranged between 14 and 15 subjects. In health areas with many clusters, the corresponding villages and/or neighbourhoods were randomly selected as previously described.

Variables of interest

The main outcome of interest in this study was CKD defined by the persistence after 3 months of albuminuria (Albumin/Creatinine ratio???30 mg/g) and/or decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (<60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) according to the K/DIGO guidelines [13]. Exposure variables included demographics (age and gender), self-reported existing conditions (hypertension, diabetes and gout), any hypertension (self-reported or screen-detected [i.e. systolic (or diastolic) blood pressure ?140 (90)], any diabetes (self-reported or screen-detected [fasting capillary glucose ?126 mg/dl)], lifestyles (alcohol consumption and smoking), use of nephrotoxins [street medications (western drugs, usually of uncertain origins that are sold in shops and regularly along market streets, instead of pharmacies, and without any control) and herbal medicines], overweight or obesity (body mass index [BMI]???25 kg/m 2 ) and blood pressure levels. Potential effect modifier was residency (urban vs. rural).

Data sources and measurement

Data were collected during household surveys by final year’s undergraduate medical students. Demographics, history of existing conditions, lifestyles and data on the use of nephrotoxins were collected during face-to-face interviews with participants. Blood pressure was measured according to the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines [14] using an automated sphygmomanometer (OMRON HEM705CP, Omron Matsusaka Co, Matsusaka City, Mie-Ken, Japan) on the right arm with participants in a sitting position after 30 min of rest with a cuff size of 23 x 12 cm or larger for obese individuals. Body weight and height were measured three times and their average used in all analyses. For each participant, 3 ml of whole blood was collected from an antecubital vein for serum creatinine and fasting glycemia (after an overnight fast of at least 8 h), and mid-stream second morning urine collected for dipstick, creatinine and albumin tests. Fasting glycemia and dipstick tests were done immediately after sample collection. The remaining sample was transported in ice to the Biochemistry Laboratory of the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital for further processing. Urine dipstick tests used the CombiScreen 7SL PLUS 7 test strips (Analyticon Biotechnologies AG, D-35104 Lichentenfeis, Germany). Fasting glycemia was performed using One Touch Ultra® easy reader® (LifeScan Europe, Cilag GmbH International, Zug, Switzerland). Serum and urinary creatinine were measured with a kinetic modification of the Jaffé reaction using Human visual spectrophotometer (Human Gesellschaft, Biochemica und Diagnostica mbH, Wiesbaden, Germany) and Beckman creatinine analyzer (Beckman CX systems instruments, Anaheim, CA, USA) while urinary albumin was measured using pyrogallol red-molybdate complex with Teco diagnostics tests (Teco Diagnostics, Anaheim, CA, USA). For any participant with positive dipstick [proteine (? trace), blood, leucocytes), albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) ?30 mg/g and fasting glycemia of at least 126 mg/dl (for unknown diabetes), another test was performed 2 to 3 weeks after to confirm the results. In participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)?<?60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 according to the MDRD formula and/or urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) ?30 mg/g, the chronicity was confirmed on another sample 3 months later.

Definitions and calculations

Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, ml/min) corresponded to creatinine clearance. For the main analyses, eGFR was based on the four-variable MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) study equation; however, for comparison purpose of the baseline estimates, we also derived the eGFR from the Cockcroft–Gault (CG) formula and the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equations [15]–[17]. 24-h albuminuria was estimated from Albumin/Creatinine ratio (mg/g). BMI was estimated as weight (kg)/height (m)*height (m).

Study size

By considering a 10 % prevalence (P) of CKD in adults [1], a precision (I) of 2 %, a correction factor (K) of 2 for the cluster effect, a 95 % confidence interval, the minimal sample size (N) required was 432 subjects using the following formula N?=?[(Z? /2) 2 PQ/ I 2 ] x K.

Handling of quantitative variables

Age was treated as continuous variable in all analysis while blood pressure, while other quantitative variables were treated both as continuous and categorical variables, based on clinically meaningful stratification. Hypertension was defined as a systolic (SBP) ?140 mmHg and/or a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ?90 mmHg or use of blood pressure lowering medications. Diabetes mellitus was defined as repeated fasting glycemia???126 mg/dl or use of glucose control agents. A BMI?>?25 kg/m 2 was used to define overweight and obesity. CKD was classified based on GFR and albuminuria categories. GFR categories of CKD included: G1 (eGFR???90); G2 (eGFR 60–89); G3a (eGFR 45–59); G3b (eGFR 30–44); G4 (eGFR 15–29) and G5 (eGFR?<?15). Albuminuria categories of CKD were: A1 (<30 mg/g); A2 (30–300 mg/g) and A3 (>300 mg/g). The following formula was used to convert serum creatinine from Jaffe reaction (SCr Jaffe ) to standardized serum creatinine (SCr Standardized ) for use in MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas: SCr Standardized ?=?0.95*SCr Jaffe – 0.10 [18].

Statistical analysis

Data analysis used SAS/STAT v9.1 software and the survey analysis procedures (‘proc surveymeans’, ‘proc surveyreg’ and ‘proc surveylogistic’) to account for the multilevel sampling design of the study. We have reported the results as means, counts and percentages and the accompanying 95 % confidence intervals. The sampling error was estimated with the use of the Taylor expansion method. Age and sex adjusted logistic regression models were used to investigate the predictors of CKD, CKD stages G3-G4 and albuminuria. A p-value <0.05 was used to indicate statistically significant results. For the main analyses, prevalence and determinants of CKD are based on MDRD derived eGFR. In secondary analyses however, we have also estimated GFR and staged kidney function using the Cockroft-Gault and CKD-EPI equations.

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Clarksburg Welcomes Davita Dialysis Center - WDTV

WDTV

Clarksburg Welcomes Davita Dialysis Center
WDTV
Davita Dialysis Center held a ribbon cutting ceremony Tuesday in Clarksburg but have been in operation for close two months. Davita is a worldwide provider of Dialysis and currently have around 2,500 locations nationwide. So far they have around 10 ...

and more »

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Many Dialysis Patients Are Unprepared for Natural Disasters - Newswise (press release)
image

Study finds patients’ disaster preparedness lacking in the wake of Hurricane Sandy

Contact Information

Available for logged-in reporters only

Citations Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology

Highlight
• Among patients scheduled to have dialysis during the landfall of Hurricane Sandy at clinics where electricity had been deprived, 26.3% missed dialysis sessions and 66.1% received dialysis at non-regular dialysis units.
• The percentage of patients who carried their insurance information and detailed medication lists with them were 75.9% and 44.3%, respectively.

Newswise — Washington, DC (July 28, 2015) — Patients on dialysis are very vulnerable during emergencies or disasters due to their dependence on technology and infrastructure such as transportation, electricity and water to sustain their lives. A study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) shows that many are unprepared for such situations.

James Winchester, MD, Naoka Murakami, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai Beth Israel), and their colleagues assessed the preparedness of 357 adults receiving outpatient dialysis during the landfall of Hurricane Sandy in New York City in October 2012 at 5 facilities where electricity had been deprived.

The researchers found that 26.3% of patients missed dialysis sessions and 66.1% received dialysis at non-regular dialysis units. The percentage of participants who carried their insurance information and detailed medication lists were 75.9% and 44.3%, respectively.

Patients whose dialysis centers distributed a “dialysis emergency packet”—which includes information on a patient’s medications, dialysis schedule, comorbid conditions, and geographical/contact information for dialysis centers—after the storm were more likely to later have copies of their medical records stored at home.

“Disasters affect all of the population, but patients with specific needs such as dialysis are especially vulnerable, dialyze in buildings often above the ground floor, and underline the need for emergency generators,” said Dr. Murakami. “There is a need to strengthen both patients’ and dialysis facilities’ awareness and preparedness to improve outcomes in natural disasters,” she added.

In an accompanying editorial, Michael Davis, CRNP and Jeffrey Kopp, MD (National Institutes of Health) noted that the study also pointed to various factors—such as having access to alternate dialysis in an integrated system, getting access to transportation, and having a stable social situation—that could be important for avoiding missed dialysis treatments. “The list includes both socio-demographic factors that indicate which dialysis patients will require particular attention and factors that can be addressed with new intervention strategies,” they wrote.

Study co-authors include Nikolas Harbord, MD, David Lucido, PhD, and Hira Babu Siktel, MD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled “Disaster Preparedness and Awareness of Hemodialysis Patients following Hurricane Sandy,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on July 28, 2015.

The editorial, entitled “Disaster Nephrology: Impact of Early Dialysis Treatments and Missed Dialysis Treatments,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on July 28, 2015.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 15,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

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Public Release: 28-Jul-2015 Many dialysis patients are unprepared for natural ... - EurekAlert (press release)
Highlight
  • Among patients scheduled to have dialysis during the landfall of Hurricane Sandy at clinics where electricity had been deprived, 26.3% missed dialysis sessions and 66.1% received dialysis at non-regular dialysis units.

  • The percentage of patients who carried their insurance information and detailed medication lists with them were 75.9% and 44.3%, respectively.

Washington, DC (July 28, 2015) -- Patients on dialysis are very vulnerable during emergencies or disasters due to their dependence on technology and infrastructure such as transportation, electricity and water to sustain their lives. A study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) shows that many are unprepared for such situations.

James Winchester, MD, Naoka Murakami, MD, PhD (Mount Sinai Beth Israel), and their colleagues assessed the preparedness of 357 adults receiving outpatient dialysis during the landfall of Hurricane Sandy in New York City in October 2012 at 5 facilities where electricity had been deprived.

The researchers found that 26.3% of patients missed dialysis sessions and 66.1% received dialysis at non-regular dialysis units. The percentage of participants who carried their insurance information and detailed medication lists were 75.9% and 44.3%, respectively.

Patients whose dialysis centers distributed a "dialysis emergency packet"--which includes information on a patient's medications, dialysis schedule, comorbid conditions, and geographical/contact information for dialysis centers--after the storm were more likely to later have copies of their medical records stored at home.

"Disasters affect all of the population, but patients with specific needs such as dialysis are especially vulnerable, dialyze in buildings often above the ground floor, and underline the need for emergency generators," said Dr. Murakami. "There is a need to strengthen both patients' and dialysis facilities' awareness and preparedness to improve outcomes in natural disasters," she added.

In an accompanying editorial, Michael Davis, CRNP and Jeffrey Kopp, MD (National Institutes of Health) noted that the study also pointed to various factors--such as having access to alternate dialysis in an integrated system, getting access to transportation, and having a stable social situation--that could be important for avoiding missed dialysis treatments. "The list includes both socio-demographic factors that indicate which dialysis patients will require particular attention and factors that can be addressed with new intervention strategies," they wrote.

###

Study co-authors include Nikolas Harbord, MD, David Lucido, PhD, and Hira Babu Siktel, MD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Disaster Preparedness and Awareness of Hemodialysis Patients following Hurricane Sandy," will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on July 28, 2015.

The editorial, entitled "Disaster Nephrology: Impact of Early Dialysis Treatments and Missed Dialysis Treatments," will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on July 28, 2015.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 15,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

...

 
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